These commonly confused words are almost always on the test.

Do you know the difference between affect and effect, or accept and except?

No?

Don't worry! Lots of people confuse the two. That's why these words and more are almost always on standardized tests. Study the words below and have a better chance slaying the grammar section of any standardized test.

  • accept - to agree to receive or do
  • except - not including 
  • adverse - unfavorable, harmful
  • averse - strongly disliking; opposed
  • advice - recommendations about what to do
  • advise - to recommend something
  • affect - to change or make a difference to
  • effect - a result; to bring about a result
  • aisle - a passage between rows of seats
  • isle - an island
  • all together - all in one place, all at once
  • altogether - completely; on the whole
  • along - moving or extending horizontally on
  • a long - referring to something of great length
  • aloud - out loud
  • allowed - permitted
  • altar - a sacred table in a church
  • alter - to change
  • amoral - not concerned with right or wrong
  • immoral - not following accepted moral standards
  • assent - agreement, approval
  • ascent - the action of rising or climbing up
  • bare - naked; to uncover
  • bear - to carry; to put up with
  • bated - in phrase 'with bated breath', i.e. in great suspense
  • baited - with bait attached or inserted
  • censure - to criticize strongly
  • censor - to ban parts of a book or film
  • cereal - a breakfast food 
  • serial - happening in a series
  • coarse - rough
  • course - a direction; a school subject; part of a meal
  • complement - an addition that improves
  • compliment - to praise or express approval; an admiring remark
  • council - a group of people who manage or advise
  • counsel - advice; to advise
  • elicit - to draw out a reply or reaction
  • illicit - not allowed by law or rules
  • ensure - to make certain that something will happen
  • insure - to provide compensation
  • foreword - an introduction to a book
  • forward - onwards, ahead
  • principal - most important; the head of a school
  • principle - a fundamental rule or belief
  • sight - the ability to see
  • site - a location
  • stationary - not moving
  • stationery - writing materials
  • allusion - indirect reference
  • illusion - false idea
  • allude - to make indirect reference to
  • elude - to avoid
  • capital - major city
  • capitol - government building
  • conscience - sense of morality
  • conscious - awake, aware
  • eminent - prominent, important
  • imminent - about to happen
  • everyday - routine, common
  • every day - each day, all the day
Kathleen JasperComment